LEARNING DISABILITIES

According to the American CDC data https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/tourette/data.html

Learning disabilities affect around 47% of those diagnosed with Tourettes Syndrome. A learning disability affects the way a person understands information. According to NHS UK

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/learning-disabilities/

around 1.5 million people in THE UK have a learning disability.

LEARNING DISABILITY IN READING (DYSLEXIA)

Dyslexia is a neurological difference that may have a significant impact on a child during education and can continue to affect them when they reach adulthood in the workplace and in everyday life. Dyslexia affects people in different ways, there is no one size fits all. It can range from a mild condition to severe condition. It tends to run in families and is a life-long condition.
Like many other conditions it is important to remember that there are always positives. Many dyslexic people show strengths in areas such as reasoning and in visual and creative fields.
Dyslexia primarily affects reading and writing skills. For more information on signs and symptoms of Dyslexia please click on the following link:

https://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/dyslexia/about-dyslexia/signs-of-dyslexia

LEARNING DISABILITY IN MATHS (DYSCALCULIA).

Dyscalculia is a condition that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills. Dyscalculic learners may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts, lack an intuitive grasp of numbers, and have problems learning number facts and procedures. Even if they produce a correct answer or use a correct method, they may do so mechanically and without confidence.

The National Numeracy Strategy (DfES, 2001)

For more information on how to check symptoms of Dyscalculia click on the following link:

https://www.dyslexia.uk.net/specific-learning-difficulties/dyscalculia/the-signs-of-dyscalculia/

LEARNING DYSABILITIES IN WRITING (DYSGRAPHIA)

Dysgraphia is a condition that affects the ability to recognise and decipher written words, and the relationship between letter forms and the sounds they make. As a result, writing, spelling and forming words is challenging for anyone with Dysgraphia.
People with Dysgraphia will likely struggle to write neatly, and their letters, numbers, words and punctuation will often appear jumbled.

Signs of dysgraphia.

• unclear, irregular, or inconsistent handwriting
• writing very slowly
• mixing styles and upper/lower case letters
• inconsistent letter and word spacing
• unusual or cramped grip or position while writing
• incorrect spelling

https://www.hft.org.uk/resources-and-guidance/learning-difficulties-and-other-needs/dysgraphia/

LEARNING DISABILITY IN MOTOR SKILLS, DEVELOPMENTAL CO-ORDINATION DISORDER (DYSPRAXIA)

Dyspraxia is a condition that affects physical co-ordination, it is thought to run in families and is said to affect more boys than girls.

A full description can be found here

https://dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/about-dyspraxia/